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Bibliography on: Drosophila: The Fly Room

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Robert J. Robbins is a biologist, an educator, a science administrator, a publisher, an information technologist, and an IT leader and manager who specializes in advancing biomedical knowledge and supporting education through the application of information technology. More About:  RJR | OUR TEAM | OUR SERVICES | THIS WEBSITE

RJR: Recommended Bibliography 19 Nov 2018 at 01:34 Created: 

Drosophila: The Fly Room

In the small "Fly Room" at Columbia University, T. H. Morgan and his students, A. H. Sturtevant, C. B. Bridges, H. J. Muller, carried out the work that laid the foundations of modern, chromosomal genetics. The excitement of those times, when the whole field of genetics was being created, is captured in this book, written by one of those present at the beginning. In a time when genomics and genetics maps are discussed almost daily in the popular press, it is worth remembering that the world's first genetic map was created in 1913 by A. H. Sturtevant, then a sophomore in college. In 1933, Morgan received the Nobel Prize in medicine, for his "discoveries concerning the role played by the chro- mosome in heredity." In the 67 years since, genetics has continued to advance, leaving behind a fascinating history. The year 2000 was the 100th anniversary of the founding of modern genetics with the rediscovery of Mendel' work and it is the year in which the full DNA sequence of the Drosophila genome was obtained. The fruit fly is still at the center of genetic research, just as it was in 1910 when work first began in Morgan's fly room.

Created with PubMed® Query: 1890:1932[PDAT] AND (drosophila OR gene OR genetic OR map OR chromosome OR mutamnt OR mutation) AND ( "morgan th"[author] OR "morgan lv"[author] OR "sturtevant AH"[author] OR "bridges CB"[author] OR "muller HJ"[author] ) NOT pmcbook NOT ispreviousversion

Citations The Papers (from PubMed®)

RevDate: 2009-11-18
CmpDate: 2007-02-02

Emerson S, AH Sturtevant (1932)

The Linkage Relations of Certain Genes in Oenothera.

Genetics, 17(4):393-412.

RevDate: 2008-11-20
CmpDate: 2006-06-01

Sturtevant AH, J Schultz (1931)

The Inadequacy of the Sub-Gene Hypothesis of the Nature of the Scute Allelomorphs of Drosophila.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 17(5):265-270.

RevDate: 2009-11-18
CmpDate: 2006-06-01

Sturtevant AH, T Dobzhansky (1930)

RECIPROCAL TRANSLOCATIONS IN DROSOPHILA AND THEIR BEARING ON OENOTHERA CYTOLOGY AND GENETICS.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 16(8):533-536.

RevDate: 2010-09-16
CmpDate: 2007-02-02

Muller HJ, E Altenburg (1930)

The Frequency of Translocations Produced by X-Rays in Drosophila.

Genetics, 15(4):283-311.

RevDate: 2010-06-10
CmpDate: 2010-07-02

Alexander J, CB Bridges (1929)

SOME PHYSICOCHEMICAL ASPECTS OF LIFE, MUTATION AND EVOLUTION.

Science (New York, N.Y.), 70(1821):508-510.

RevDate: 2008-11-20
CmpDate: 2007-02-02

Sturtevant AH (1928)

A Further Study of the so-Called Mutation at the Bar Locus of Drosophila.

Genetics, 13(5):401-409.

RevDate: 2009-11-18
CmpDate: 2007-02-02

Muller HJ (1928)

The Measurement of Gene Mutation Rate in Drosophila, Its High Variability, and Its Dependence upon Temperature.

Genetics, 13(4):279-357.

RevDate: 2010-06-10
CmpDate: 2010-07-02

Muller HJ (1927)

ARTIFICIAL TRANSMUTATION OF THE GENE.

Science (New York, N.Y.), 66(1699):84-87.

RevDate: 2010-06-23
CmpDate: 2010-06-23

Bridges CB (1927)

THE RELATION OF THE AGE OF THE FEMALE TO CROSSING OVER IN THE THIRD CHROMOSOME OF DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER.

The Journal of general physiology, 8(6):689-700.

The four methods of examining the relation of amount of multiple crossing over to age of mothers agree in showing that the "internode length" or average distance required for double crossing over has changed in a characteristic fashion, giving an M-shaped curve. These changes have not been independent of changes in total recombination but concomitant with them. However, the changes in recombination percentages were far greater than could be accounted for by change in internode length, and the larger factor must be assumed to be changes in the coefficients of crossing over. The amounts of these changes are greatest for the mid-sections of the chromosome and least for the distal sections. The changes in the two limbs are of like amount for equal distances from the center of symmetry in the distribution of simple and multiple crossing over.

RevDate: 2009-11-18
CmpDate: 2007-02-02

Stern C, CB Bridges (1926)

The Mutants of the Extreme Left End of the Second Chromosome of DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER.

Genetics, 11(6):503-530.

RevDate: 2008-11-20
CmpDate: 2007-02-02

Stark MB, CB Bridges (1926)

The Linkage Relations of a Benign Tumor in Drosophila.

Genetics, 11(3):249-266.

RevDate: 2008-11-20
CmpDate: 2006-06-01

Morgan LV (1926)

Correlation between Shape and Behavior of a Chromosome.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 12(3):180-181.

RevDate: 2008-11-20
CmpDate: 2007-02-02

Muller HJ, JM Jacobs-Muller (1925)

The Standard Errors of Chromosome Distances and Coincidence.

Genetics, 10(6):509-524.

RevDate: 2008-11-20
CmpDate: 2006-06-01

Bridges CB (1925)

Haploidy in Drosophila Melanogaster.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 11(11):706-710.

RevDate: 2008-11-20
CmpDate: 2006-06-01

Bridges CB (1925)

Elimination of Chromosomes Due to a Mutant (Minute-N) in Drosophila Melanogaster.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 11(11):701-706.

RevDate: 2009-11-18
CmpDate: 2007-02-02

Muller HJ (1925)

The Regionally Differential Effect of X Rays on Crossing over in Autosomes of Drosophila.

Genetics, 10(5):470-507.

RevDate: 2010-09-16
CmpDate: 2007-02-02

Bridges CB, EG Anderson (1925)

Crossing over in the X Chromosomes of Triploid Females of DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER.

Genetics, 10(5):418-441.

RevDate: 2008-11-20
CmpDate: 2007-02-02

Morgan LV (1925)

Polyploidy in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER with Two Attached X Chromosomes.

Genetics, 10(2):148-178.

RevDate: 2009-11-18
CmpDate: 2007-02-02

Sturtevant AH (1925)

The Effects of Unequal Crossing over at the Bar Locus in Drosophila.

Genetics, 10(2):117-147.

RevDate: 2010-06-10
CmpDate: 2010-07-02

Sturtevant AH, TH Morgan (1923)

REVERSE MUTATION OF THE BAR GENE CORRELATED WITH CROSSING OVER.

Science (New York, N.Y.), 57(1487):746-747.

RevDate: 2010-06-10
CmpDate: 2010-07-02

Bridges CB (1921)

TRIPLOID INTERSEXES IN DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER.

Science (New York, N.Y.), 54(1394):252-254.

RevDate: 2009-11-18
CmpDate: 2006-06-01

Sturtevant AH (1921)

A Case of Rearrangement of Genes in Drosophila.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 7(8):235-237.

RevDate: 2010-09-16
CmpDate: 2006-06-01

Bridges CB (1921)

Genetical and Cytological Proof of Non-disjunction of the Fourth Chromosome of Drosophila Melanogaster.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 7(7):186-192.

RevDate: 2009-11-18
CmpDate: 2006-06-01

Sturtevant AH (1921)

Linkage Variation and Chromosome Maps.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 7(7):181-183.

RevDate: 2010-06-10
CmpDate: 2010-07-02

Bridges CB (1921)

PROOF OF NON-DISJUNCTION FOR THE FOURTH CHROMOSOME OF DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER.

Science (New York, N.Y.), 53(1370):308.

RevDate: 2008-11-20
CmpDate: 2006-06-01

Bridges CB (1921)

Current Maps of the Location of the Mutant Genes of Drosophila Melanogaster.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 7(4):127-132.

RevDate: 2009-11-18
CmpDate: 2007-02-02

Sturtevant AH (1921)

Genetic Studies on DROSOPHILA SIMULANS. III. Autosomal Genes. General Discussion.

Genetics, 6(2):179-207.

RevDate: 2010-09-14
CmpDate: 2007-02-02

Sturtevant AH (1921)

Genetic Studies on DROSOPHILA SIMULANS. II. Sex-Linked Group of Genes.

Genetics, 6(1):43-64.

RevDate: 2008-11-20
CmpDate: 2006-06-01

Bridges CB (1920)

The Mutant Crossveinless in Drosophila Melanogaster.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 6(11):660-663.

RevDate: 2008-11-20
CmpDate: 2007-02-02

Sturtevant AH (1920)

Genetic Studies on DROSOPHILA SIMULANS. I. Introduction. Hybrids with DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER.

Genetics, 5(5):488-500.

RevDate: 2008-11-20
CmpDate: 2006-06-01

Morgan TH, Sturtevant AH, CB Bridge (1920)

The Evidence for the Linear Order of the Genes.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 6(4):162-164.

RevDate: 2010-06-10
CmpDate: 2010-07-02

Sturtevant AH (1920)

INTERSEXES IN DROSOPHILA SIMULANS.

Science (New York, N.Y.), 51(1317):325-327.

RevDate: 2008-11-20
CmpDate: 2007-02-02

Altenburg E, HJ Muller (1920)

The Genetic Basis of Truncate Wing,-an Inconstant and Modifiable Character in Drosophila.

Genetics, 5(1):1-59.

RevDate: 2010-09-28
CmpDate: 2010-06-22

Bridges CB (1919)

VERMILION-DEFICIENCY.

The Journal of general physiology, 1(6):645-656.

In May, 1916, a culture of Drosophila melanogaster showed that a new sex-linked lethal had arisen. The linkage relations indicated that the position of the lethal was in the neighborhood of the sex-linked recessive "vermilion," whose locus in the X chromosome is at 33.0. When females heterozygous for the lethal were outcrossed to vermilion males, all the daughters that received the lethal-bearing chromosome showed vermilion eye-color, though, from the pedigree, vermilion was known to be absent from the ancestry of the mother. The lethal action and the unexpected appearance of vermilion both suggested that this was another instance of the phenomenon called "deficiency;" that is, the loss or "inactivation" of the genes of a section of the X chromosome. The lethal action would then be due to the deficient region including one or more genes necessary for the life of the individual. The appearance of vermilion in females carrying only one vermilion gene would be explainable on the ground that the deficient-bearing females are virtually haploid for the region including the vermilion locus. Linkage tests showed that the amount of crossing over in the neighborhood of the deficiency was cut down by about five units. Part of this may be attributed to the actual length of the "deficient" region, within which it is probable that no crossing over occurs, and part (probably most) to an alteration in the synaptic relations in the regions immediately adjacent. In more remote regions there was no disturbance or perhaps a slight rise in the frequency of crossing over. Both the local fall and the possible rise in more distant regions would seem to argue that a "pucker" at synapsis had been caused by an actual shortening of the deficient chromosome. That the deficient region extends to the left of the locus of vermilion was indicated by a test in which it was observed that the presence of an extra piece of chromosome including the loci for vermilion and sable ("vermilion-sable duplication") did not neutralize the lethal action of the deficiency. Haploid tests with the other recessive mutations in the neighborhood of vermilion showed that the deficiency was not extensive enough to include their loci. Cytological preparations were made but were unsatisfactory. The stock was finally lost, apparently as the result of injurious action upon viability, fertility, and productivity by the deficiency.

RevDate: 2009-11-18
CmpDate: 2006-06-01

Sturtevant AH, Bridges CB, TH Morgan (1919)

The Spatial Relations of Genes.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 5(5):168-173.

RevDate: 2010-09-15
CmpDate: 2006-06-01

Bridges CB (1918)

Maroon: A Recurrent Mutation in Drosophila.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 4(10):316-318.

RevDate: 2010-06-22
CmpDate: 2010-06-22

Boring AM, TH Morgan (1918)

LUTEAR CELLS AND HEN-FEATHERING.

The Journal of general physiology, 1(1):127-131.

The experimental evidence had made clear that some substance is produced in the testis of the male Sebright that suppresses in him the development of the secondary sexual plumage of the cock of his species. The detection in his testis of lutear cells like those in hens makes the conclusion highly probable that it is these cells that cause the suppression of cock-feathering in both the Sebright male and in hens of all fowls. Genetic work by Morgan had shown that one or two Mendelian factor-differences are responsible for hen-feathering in the Sebright. These factor-differences produce their effects through the testes. The presence of these genetic factors, we now see, causes the testes of the Sebright to produce a kind of secretory cell that is ordinarily only produced in the female, or possibly to a slight extent in young males (Boring), or in numbers insufficient to suppress the male plumage in the testes of some ordinary cock birds (Reeves).

RevDate: 2009-11-18
CmpDate: 2007-02-02

Muller HJ (1918)

Genetic Variability, Twin Hybrids and Constant Hybrids, in a Case of Balanced Lethal Factors.

Genetics, 3(5):422-499.

RevDate: 2010-06-09
CmpDate: 2010-07-02

Sturtevant AH (1918)

A PARALLEL MUTATION IN DROSOPHILA FUNEBRIS.

Science (New York, N.Y.), 48(1229):72-73.

RevDate: 2009-11-18
CmpDate: 2006-06-01

Metz CW, CB Bridges (1917)

Incompatibility of Mutant Races in Drosophila.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 3(12):673-678.

RevDate: 2008-11-20
CmpDate: 2006-06-01

Muller HJ (1917)

An Oenothera-Like Case in Drosophila.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 3(10):619-626.

RevDate: 2009-11-18
CmpDate: 2006-06-01

Sturtevant AH (1917)

Genetic Factors Affecting the Strength of Linkage in Drosophila.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 3(9):555-558.

RevDate: 2010-12-24
CmpDate: 2007-02-02

Bridges CB (1916)

Non-Disjunction as Proof of the Chromosome Theory of Heredity (Concluded).

Genetics, 1(2):107-163.

RevDate: 2008-11-20
CmpDate: 2007-02-02

Bridges CB (1916)

Non-Disjunction as Proof of the Chromosome Theory of Heredity.

Genetics, 1(1):1-52.

RevDate: 2010-06-09
CmpDate: 2010-07-02

Bridges CB (1914)

DIRECT PROOF THROUGH NON-DISJUNCTION THAT THE SEX-LINKED GENES OF DROSOPHILA ARE BORNE BY THE X-CHROMOSOME.

Science (New York, N.Y.), 40(1020):107-109.

RevDate: 2010-06-09
CmpDate: 2010-07-02

Muller HJ (1914)

A FACTOR FOR THE FOURTH CHROMOSOME OF DROSOPHILA.

Science (New York, N.Y.), 39(1016):906.

RevDate: 2010-06-09
CmpDate: 2010-07-02

Morgan TH (1914)

HAS THE WHITE MAN MORE CHROMOSOMES THAN THE NEGRO?.

Science (New York, N.Y.), 39(1014):827-828.

RevDate: 2010-06-09
CmpDate: 2010-07-02

Sturtevant AH (1913)

A THIRD GROUP OF LINKED GENES IN DROSOPHILA AMPELOPHILA.

Science (New York, N.Y.), 37(965):990-992.

RevDate: 2010-06-09
CmpDate: 2010-07-02

Morgan TH (1911)

CHROMOSOMES AND ASSOCIATIVE INHERITANCE.

Science (New York, N.Y.), 34(880):636-638.

RevDate: 2010-06-09
CmpDate: 2010-07-02

Morgan TH (1911)

THE ORIGIN OF FIVE MUTATIONS IN EYE COLOR IN DROSOPHILA AND THEIR MODES OF INHERITANCE.

Science (New York, N.Y.), 33(849):534-537.

RevDate: 2010-06-09
CmpDate: 2010-07-02

Morgan TH (1911)

THE ORIGIN OF NINE WING MUTATIONS IN DROSOPHILA.

Science (New York, N.Y.), 33(848):496-499.

RevDate: 2010-06-09
CmpDate: 2010-07-02

Morgan TH (1910)

SEX LIMITED INHERITANCE IN DROSOPHILA.

Science (New York, N.Y.), 32(812):120-122.

RJR Experience and Expertise

Researcher

Robbins holds BS, MS, and PhD degrees in the life sciences. He served as a tenured faculty member in the Zoology and Biological Science departments at Michigan State University. He is currently exploring the intersection between genomics, microbial ecology, and biodiversity — an area that promises to transform our understanding of the biosphere.

Educator

Robbins has extensive experience in college-level education: At MSU he taught introductory biology, genetics, and population genetics. At JHU, he was an instructor for a special course on biological database design. At FHCRC, he team-taught a graduate-level course on the history of genetics. At Bellevue College he taught medical informatics.

Administrator

Robbins has been involved in science administration at both the federal and the institutional levels. At NSF he was a program officer for database activities in the life sciences, at DOE he was a program officer for information infrastructure in the human genome project. At the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, he served as a vice president for fifteen years.

Technologist

Robbins has been involved with information technology since writing his first Fortran program as a college student. At NSF he was the first program officer for database activities in the life sciences. At JHU he held an appointment in the CS department and served as director of the informatics core for the Genome Data Base. At the FHCRC he was VP for Information Technology.

Publisher

While still at Michigan State, Robbins started his first publishing venture, founding a small company that addressed the short-run publishing needs of instructors in very large undergraduate classes. For more than 20 years, Robbins has been operating The Electronic Scholarly Publishing Project, a web site dedicated to the digital publishing of critical works in science, especially classical genetics.

Speaker

Robbins is well-known for his speaking abilities and is often called upon to provide keynote or plenary addresses at international meetings. For example, in July, 2012, he gave a well-received keynote address at the Global Biodiversity Informatics Congress, sponsored by GBIF and held in Copenhagen. The slides from that talk can be seen HERE.

Facilitator

Robbins is a skilled meeting facilitator. He prefers a participatory approach, with part of the meeting involving dynamic breakout groups, created by the participants in real time: (1) individuals propose breakout groups; (2) everyone signs up for one (or more) groups; (3) the groups with the most interested parties then meet, with reports from each group presented and discussed in a subsequent plenary session.

Designer

Robbins has been engaged with photography and design since the 1960s, when he worked for a professional photography laboratory. He now prefers digital photography and tools for their precision and reproducibility. He designed his first web site more than 20 years ago and he personally designed and implemented this web site. He engages in graphic design as a hobby.

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Collection of publications by R J Robbins

Reprints and preprints of publications, slide presentations, instructional materials, and data compilations written or prepared by Robert Robbins. Most papers deal with computational biology, genome informatics, using information technology to support biomedical research, and related matters.

Research Gate page for R J Robbins

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